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    Archive for June, 2009

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    Bummer Boy takes on Gladwell, Part 1

    Since Will Richardson dubbed me IWB Bummer Boy, and my one blog post (so far) about Edubloggercon ’09 came off as cranky, I figured I’d stay in role and finally churn out my long promised take on Malcolm Gladwell and specifically his newest book, Outliers. I’ve had some quick back-and-forth with some folks on Twitter […]

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    EBC ’09 musings #1: The time(s) and place(s) for backchannels

    There’s a bit of irony that I’m writing this given that Scott McLeod got on my case this morning for having my head in my Blackberry too much.  I’m glad he did that.  Here’s why… I’m disconcerted that we’re here at Edubloggercon ’09 which is billed as an unconference where conversations happen.  The goal is […]

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    Peer-review of Marzano’s IWB Study, Part V

    [NOTE: this is the final post in a series of posts about a report recently issued based on a study done by Marzano Research Laboratory.  Part I is here, Part II is here, Part III is here, and Part IV is here.] PART V: SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS [NOTE #2:  I know, I know…I’m a couple […]

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    “Peer-review” of Marzano’s IWB Study, Part IV

    [NOTE: this is the fourth in a series of posts about a report recently issued based on a study done by Marzano Research Laboratory.  Part I is here, Part II is here, and Part III is here.] PART IV:  INTERNAL VALIDITY “Internal Validity is the approximate truth about inferences regarding cause-effect or causal relationships” (Trochim, […]

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    “Peer-review” of Marzano’s IWB Study Report, Part III

    [NOTE: this is the third in a series of posts about a report recently issued based on a study done by Marzano Research Laboratory.  Part I is here and Part II is here.] PART III:  MEASUREMENT VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY As I wrote yesterday, Marzano and his research team had a “dependent variable problem.”  That is, […]

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