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    Archive for the ‘research’ Category

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    A Critique of Rick Hess’ Edu-Scholar Public Presence Rankings

    Rick Hess just released the 2013 version of his Edu-scholar Public Presence Rankings. He claims that these rankings are “…designed to recognize those university-based academics who are contributing most substantially to public debates about K-12 and higher education. The rankings offer a useful, if imperfect, gauge of the public impact edu-scholars had in 2012.” I’m […]

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    Data + both/and

    Nate Silver has received LOTS of attention in the mainstream media and among those I follow on Twitter. Forget the pre-election bashing of Silver, the post-election range of opinions on Silver’s work is unbelievably dramatic. Either “America’s Chief Wizard Nate Silver Had the Best Election Night of Anybody…” or “Obama’s big win does not mean […]

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    Modern scholarly communication in education: An Example

    I’ve written a bit about scholarly communication in education, and our need to modernize our modes and systems (see e.g. THIS and THIS and THIS and THIS…). This post offers an example of modern scholarly communication. At the heart of this “story” is Dr. Sara Goldrick-Rab, Associate Professor of Educational Policy Studies and Sociology at the University […]

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    What would you want to know about educational research?

    I have an opportunity to teach a course that I’ve never taught before, but that I’ve coveted teaching for awhile. The course is called “Research Methods in Education,” and the university bulletin describes it as: Designed to provide an introductory understanding of educational research and evaluation studies. Emphasizes fundamental concepts, procedures and processes appropriate for […]

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    A critique of the NEPC report on K-12 online learning

    I have great respect for the folks at the National Educational Policy Center. In particular, I hold Gene Glass and Kevin Welner in very high regard; they are genuine, world-class scholars. But, I think they fouled up their newest policy brief, Online K-12 Schooling in the U.S.: Uncertain Private Ventures in Need of Public Regulation. […]

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